Research

The Program on Culture, Capitalism, and Global Change

We live during a time of epochal social transformation that is at once faster paced, more far-reaching in its scope and scale, and greater in impact than any previous period in human history. No two forces are more integral to this transformation than those of capitalism and globalization. No two forces are, as a result, more consequential for the prospects of human flourishing in our moment.

The mission of the Program on Culture, Capitalism, and Global Change seeks to critically engage these two forces of macro-level social change. As such, it is principally interested in examining and assessing: (a) the changing moral ecology of economic life in light of the structural transformations of global capitalism—what we are calling the new “spirits” of capitalism; (b) the rise and significance of the world’s first global culture; and (c) the conflicts and dilemmas (but also opportunities) both developments are generating at home and abroad. The program pursues this mission by sponsoring two separate, but overlapping research projects: The New “Spirits” of Capitalism Project and The Global Culture Project.

View past events and a list of publications >>

Past Events

 “Actors and Organizations as Cultural Forms in World Society,” lecture by John Meyer (2011)

“Thrift and American Culture,” conference (2005)

“Religion, Enlightenment, and the New Global Order,” conference held in Vienna, Austria (2005)

“Religion and Globalization,” Labrosse-Levinson Lecture by Peter Berger (2001)

Publications

Books

Crawford, Matthew. Shopclass as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work. New York: Penguin, 2009. Reprinted in the UK as The Case for Working with Your Hands (Viking, 2010). Translated into German (Ullstein, 2010), Italian (Mondadori, 2010), French (La Découverte, 2010), Spanish (Empressa Activa, 2010), Chinese (Taiwan) (Locus Publishing Company, 2010), Chinese (PRC) (Cheers Publishing Company, 2010), and Korean (E-Eum Publishing House, 2011).

Yates, Joshua J., and James Davison Hunter, eds. Thrift and Thriving in America: Capitalism and Moral Order from the Puritans to the Present. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

In collaboration with The Hedgehog Review:

Articles and Book Chapters

Matthew B. Crawford

  • “The Case for Working with Your Hands.” New York Times Magazine (2009): MM36.
  • “Shop Class as Soulcraft.” The New Atlantis 13 (2006): 7–24.

Jeffrey S. Dill

  • “Cosmopolitanism: A Bibliographic Essay.” The Hedgehog Review 11.3 (Fall 2009): 125–133.
  • “Teaching the Virtues of a Global Citizen: The Demands of a 21st Century Education.” Culture 3.2 (Fall 2009): 2–4.

David Franz

  • “Pillar, Ledger, and Mission: Ontologies of the American Corporation.” The Hedgehog Review 11.2 (Summer 2009): 7–18.
  • “Rethinking Markets, Monies, and Organizations: An Interview with Viviana A. Zelizer.” The Hedgehog Review 11.2 (Summer 2009): 66–75.
  • “Forgetting the Obvious: Relearning Old Lessons from The Great Transformation.” Culture 3.1 (Spring 2009): 2–4.
  • “The Moral Life of Cubicles.” The New Atlantis 19 (2009): 132–139.
  • “Intellectuals and Public Responsibility.” The Hedgehog Review 9.1 (Spring 2007): 98–104.

Jonas Hart

  • “The Moral Life of Corporations: A Bibliographic Review.” The Hedgehog Review 11.2 (Summer 2009): 80–87.

James Davison Hunter

  • “Thrift and Moral Formation.” Thrift and Thriving in America: Capitalism and Moral Order from the Puritans to the Present. Ed. Joshua J. Yates and James Davison Hunter. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
  • “Virtue... On the Cheap.” Society 39.3 (March/April 2002): 42–53. Republished in Therapeutic Culture: Triumph and Defeat. Ed. Jonathan B. Imber. New Brunswick: Transaction, 2004. 215–240.
  • “In the Vanguard of Globalization: The World of American Globalizers” (with Joshua J. Yates). Many Globalizations: Cultural Diversity in the Contemporary World. Ed. Peter L. Berger and Samuel P. Huntington. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. 323–374.

Steven L. Jones

  • “Religious Landscapes of Globalizations: A Review.” The Hedgehog Review 4.2 (Summer 2002): 109–115.

Joshua J. Yates

  • “The ‘Drive to Reform’ and Its Discontents” (with Charles T. Mathewes). Aspiring to Fullness in a Secular Age. Ed. Justin Klassen and Carlos Colorado. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, forthcoming.
  • “Introduction: The Question of Thrift” (with James Davison Hunter). Thrift and Thriving in America: Capitalism and Moral Order from the Puritans to the Present. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
  • “Disputing Abundance: The Antiglobalization Protest Movement and Our Changing Natural Imaginary.” Thrift and Thriving in America: Capitalism and Moral Order from the Puritans to the Present. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
  • “Conclusion: Thrift & Thriving: Toward a Moral Framework for Economic Life” (with James Davison Hunter). Thrift and Thriving in America: Capitalism and Moral Order from the Puritans to the Present. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
  • “The Humanitarian-Human Rights Nexus: A Global Culture Approach.” Routledge International Handbook of Human Rights. Ed. Thomas Cushman. New York: Routledge, 2010.
  • “Mapping the Good World: The New Cosmopolitans and Our Changing World Picture.” The Hedgehog Review 12.3 (Fall 2009): 7–29.
  • “Making Sense of Cosmopolitanism: A Conversation with Kwame Anthony Appiah.” The Hedgehog Review 12.3 (Fall 2009): 42–50.
  • “A Bailout of a Different Sort: Rediscovering Thrift” Culture 3.1 (Spring 2009): 5–8.
  • “From 11/9/1989 to 9/11/2001 and Beyond: The Return of Jeremiad and the Specter of Secularization.” Prophecies of Godlessness: Predictions of America’s Imminent Secularization from the Puritans to the Present Day. Ed. Charles Mathewes and Christopher McKnight Nichols. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. 209–231.
  • “The Resurgence of Jihad and the Specter of Religious Populism.” SAIS Review of International Affairs 27.1 (Winter-Spring 2007): 127–144.
  • “An Interview with Ulrich Beck on Fear and Risk Society.” The Hedgehog Review 5.3 (Fall 2003): 96–107.
  • “In the Vanguard of Globalization: The World of American Globalizers” (with James Davison Hunter). Many Globalizations: Cultural Diversity in the Contemporary World. Ed. Peter L. Berger and Samuel P. Huntington. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. 323–374.
  • “American Evangelicals: The Overlooked Globalizers and Their Unintended Gospel of Modernity.” The Hedgehog Review 4.2 (Summer 2002): 66–90.

Who We Are

The Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture is an interdisciplinary research center and intellectual community at the University of Virginia committed to understanding contemporary cultural change and its individual and social consequences, training young scholars, and providing intellectual leadership in service to the public good.

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